Hurricanes

People come from all over the world to visit Florida for its tropical weather, theme parks, and beautiful beaches. As a South Florida resident, we have to deal with the other side of the tropical climate, the six-month-long Atlantic hurricane season, which begins June 1 and ends November 30. The peak of the season runs from approximately mid-August to late October. Hurricanes affect ALL of Florida, with areas around the coastlines highly susceptible to substantial destruction.

Categories of Storms

According to the FSU Climate center, the different categories of storms are:

Tropical Depression – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 33 knots (38 mph) or less.

Tropical Storm – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute steady surface wind ranges from 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph) inclusive.

Hurricane – A tropical cyclone in the Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or eastern Pacific in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 64 knots (74 mph) or higher.

Major Hurricane – A hurricane that reaches Category 3 (sustained winds greater than 110 mph) on the Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Hurricane Categories

The National Hurricane Center categorized hurricanes using the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, using a 1-5 rating. Below is a detailed explanation of the categories, wind speeds, and the type of damage likely to occur during a storm.

Category Sustained Winds Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds
1 74-95 mph
(119-153 km/h) 64-82 kt
Dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-built frame homes could have a roof, shingle, vinyl siding, and gutter damage. Large branches of trees will break, and shallowly rooted trees may fall. Damage to power lines may happen, resulting in power outages that may last for days. Traffic signals may experience outages.
2 96-110 mph
(154-177 km/h) 83-95 kt
Hazardous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Shallowly rooted trees will topple or become uprooted, causing home damage and road blockages. Power loss can be expected, and outages can last from several days to weeks.
3
(Major)
111-129 mph
(178-208 km/h) 96-112 kt
Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can incur major damage; roof decking and gable ends can be removed. A large portion of tees will be uprooted or snapped, causing damage to power lines, property, and blocking roads. Significant power outages will occur; water and power will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
4
(Major)
130-156 mph
(209-251 km/h) 113-136 kt
Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may have severe damage. With the potential to sustain losses to most of the roof and some exterior walls. The majority of trees will snap or uproot and power lines and poles will be downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will potentially last weeks to months. Most of the area will have severe damage and be potentially uninhabitable for weeks to months.
5
(Major)
157 mph or higher
(252 km/h or higher) 137 kt or higher
Catastrophic damage will occur: A large majority of framed homes will be destroyed, including complete roof failure and collapsed walls. Debris, water, trees, and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages could last for weeks to possibly months. The majority of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks to months.

People come from all over the world to visit Florida for its tropical weather, theme parks, and beautiful beaches. As a South Florida resident, we have to deal with the other side of the tropical climate, the six-month-long Atlantic hurricane season, which begins June 1 and ends November 30. The peak of the season runs from approximately mid-August to late October. Hurricanes affect ALL of Florida, with areas around the coastlines highly susceptible to substantial destruction.

Categories of Storms

According to the FSU Climate center, the different categories of storms are:

Tropical Depression – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 33 knots (38 mph) or less.

Tropical Storm – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute steady surface wind ranges from 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph) inclusive.

Hurricane – A tropical cyclone in the Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or eastern Pacific in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 64 knots (74 mph) or higher.

Major Hurricane – A hurricane that reaches Category 3 (sustained winds greater than 110 mph) on the Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Hurricane Categories

The National Hurricane Center categorized hurricanes using the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, using a 1-5 rating. Below is a detailed explanation of the categories, wind speeds, and the type of damage likely to occur during a storm.

CATEGORY 1

Sustained Winds: 74-95 mph (119-153 km/h) 64-82 kt
Damage Type: Dangerous winds will produce some damage – Well-built frame homes could have a roof, shingle, vinyl siding, and gutter damage. Large branches of trees will break, and shallowly rooted trees may fall. Damage to power lines may happen, resulting in power outages that may last for days. Traffic signals may experience outages.

CATEGORY 2

Sustained Winds: 96-110 mph (154-177 km/h) 83-95 kt
Damage Type: Hazardous winds will cause extensive damage – Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Shallowly rooted trees will topple or become uprooted, causing home damage and road blockages. Power loss can be expected, and outages can last from several days to weeks.

CATEGORY 3 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 11-129 mph (178-208 km/h) 96-112 kt
Damage Type: Devastating damage will occur – Well-built framed homes can incur major damage; roof decking and gable ends can be removed. A large portion of tees will be uprooted or snapped, causing damage to power lines, property, and blocking roads. Significant power outages will occur; water and power will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

CATEGORY 4 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 130-156 mph (209-251 km/h) 113-136 kt
Damage Type: Catastrophic damage will occur – Well-built framed homes may have severe damage. With the potential to sustain losses to most of the roof and some exterior walls. The majority of trees will snap or uproot and power lines and poles will be downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will potentially last weeks to months. Most of the area will have severe damage and be potentially uninhabitable for weeks to months.

CATEGORY 5 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 157 mph or higher (252 km/h or higher) 137 kt or higher
Damage Type: Catastrophic damage will occur – A large majority of framed homes will be destroyed, including complete roof failure and collapsed walls. Debris, water, trees, and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages could last for weeks to possibly months. The majority of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks to months.

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Hurricanes

People come from all over the world to visit Florida for its tropical weather, theme parks, and beautiful beaches. As a South Florida resident, we have to deal with the other side of the tropical climate, the six-month-long Atlantic hurricane season, which begins June 1 and ends November 30. The peak of the season runs from approximately mid-August to late October. Hurricanes affect ALL of Florida, with areas around the coastlines highly susceptible to substantial destruction.

Categories of Storms

According to the FSU Climate center, the different categories of storms are:

Tropical Depression – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 33 knots (38 mph) or less.

Tropical Storm – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute steady surface wind ranges from 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph) inclusive.

Hurricane – A tropical cyclone in the Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or eastern Pacific in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 64 knots (74 mph) or higher.

Major Hurricane – A hurricane that reaches Category 3 (sustained winds greater than 110 mph) on the Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Hurricane Categories

The National Hurricane Center categorized hurricanes using the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, using a 1-5 rating. Below is a detailed explanation of the categories, wind speeds, and the type of damage likely to occur during a storm.

Category Sustained Winds Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds
1 74-95 mph
(119-153 km/h) 64-82 kt
Dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-built frame homes could have a roof, shingle, vinyl siding, and gutter damage. Large branches of trees will break, and shallowly rooted trees may fall. Damage to power lines may happen, resulting in power outages that may last for days. Traffic signals may experience outages.
2 96-110 mph
(154-177 km/h) 83-95 kt
Hazardous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Shallowly rooted trees will topple or become uprooted, causing home damage and road blockages. Power loss can be expected, and outages can last from several days to weeks.
3
(Major)
111-129 mph
(178-208 km/h) 96-112 kt
Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can incur major damage; roof decking and gable ends can be removed. A large portion of tees will be uprooted or snapped, causing damage to power lines, property, and blocking roads. Significant power outages will occur; water and power will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
4
(Major)
130-156 mph
(209-251 km/h) 113-136 kt
Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may have severe damage. With the potential to sustain losses to most of the roof and some exterior walls. The majority of trees will snap or uproot and power lines and poles will be downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will potentially last weeks to months. Most of the area will have severe damage and be potentially uninhabitable for weeks to months.
5
(Major)
157 mph or higher
(252 km/h or higher) 137 kt or higher
Catastrophic damage will occur: A large majority of framed homes will be destroyed, including complete roof failure and collapsed walls. Debris, water, trees, and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages could last for weeks to possibly months. The majority of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks to months.

People come from all over the world to visit Florida for its tropical weather, theme parks, and beautiful beaches. As a South Florida resident, we have to deal with the other side of the tropical climate, the six-month-long Atlantic hurricane season, which begins June 1 and ends November 30. The peak of the season runs from approximately mid-August to late October. Hurricanes affect ALL of Florida, with areas around the coastlines highly susceptible to substantial destruction.

Categories of Storms

According to the FSU Climate center, the different categories of storms are:

Tropical Depression – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 33 knots (38 mph) or less.

Tropical Storm – A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute steady surface wind ranges from 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph) inclusive.

Hurricane – A tropical cyclone in the Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or eastern Pacific in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 64 knots (74 mph) or higher.

Major Hurricane – A hurricane that reaches Category 3 (sustained winds greater than 110 mph) on the Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Hurricane Categories

The National Hurricane Center categorized hurricanes using the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, using a 1-5 rating. Below is a detailed explanation of the categories, wind speeds, and the type of damage likely to occur during a storm.

CATEGORY 1

Sustained Winds: 74-95 mph (119-153 km/h) 64-82 kt
Damage Type: Dangerous winds will produce some damage – Well-built frame homes could have a roof, shingle, vinyl siding, and gutter damage. Large branches of trees will break, and shallowly rooted trees may fall. Damage to power lines may happen, resulting in power outages that may last for days. Traffic signals may experience outages.

CATEGORY 2

Sustained Winds: 96-110 mph (154-177 km/h) 83-95 kt
Damage Type: Hazardous winds will cause extensive damage – Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Shallowly rooted trees will topple or become uprooted, causing home damage and road blockages. Power loss can be expected, and outages can last from several days to weeks.

CATEGORY 3 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 11-129 mph (178-208 km/h) 96-112 kt
Damage Type: Devastating damage will occur – Well-built framed homes can incur major damage; roof decking and gable ends can be removed. A large portion of tees will be uprooted or snapped, causing damage to power lines, property, and blocking roads. Significant power outages will occur; water and power will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

CATEGORY 4 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 130-156 mph (209-251 km/h) 113-136 kt
Damage Type: Catastrophic damage will occur – Well-built framed homes may have severe damage. With the potential to sustain losses to most of the roof and some exterior walls. The majority of trees will snap or uproot and power lines and poles will be downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will potentially last weeks to months. Most of the area will have severe damage and be potentially uninhabitable for weeks to months.

CATEGORY 5 (MAJOR)

Sustained Winds: 157 mph or higher (252 km/h or higher) 137 kt or higher
Damage Type: Catastrophic damage will occur – A large majority of framed homes will be destroyed, including complete roof failure and collapsed walls. Debris, water, trees, and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages could last for weeks to possibly months. The majority of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks to months.

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The STS Way

Take advantage of our special discount and free quote service. Learn about the STS way today